Skip to main content
Skip to main content

WKU News

With lung cancer, quitters do better than smokers

(Reuters Health) - Younger people with advanced lung cancer who quit smoking more than a year before their diagnosis survive longer than those who continue smoking, according to a new study.

It's known that people who never smoked are more likely to survive the disease than those who light up. But whether former smokers do any better than current ones has been less clear.

"The findings do suggest there is some benefit to quitting smoking," said Amy Ferketich of Ohio State University College of Public Health in Columbus, who worked on the study.

However, quitters who were older or who had earlier stages of lung cancer did not have an advantage over smokers, she and her colleagues report in the journal Cancer.

Ferketich's group used medical records from 4,200 lung cancer patients treated at eight cancer centers around the country. Patients who never smoked were more likely to survive the less advanced cancers - stage 1, 2 or 3 - than were former or current smokers, the researchers found.

Among smokers with stage 1 or 2 lung cancer, for instance, 72 percent survived at least two years, compared to 93 percent of the never-smokers and 76 percent of people who'd kicked the habit a year or more before diagnosis.

Only 15 percent of smokers with stage 4 disease survived two years, while 40 percent of never-smokers and 20 percent of former smokers did.

After adjusting the numbers for factors such as age, race and radiation treatment, the researchers determined that quitters were just as likely to die from the early-stage cancers as were current smokers.

But for advanced cancers, people under 85 who had stopped smoking more than a year before their diagnosis survived longer than smokers. Forty-five-year-old former smokers, for instance, were 30 percent less likely to die from stage 4 lung cancer within two years than were current smokers.

Smoking is the number one risk factor for developing lung cancer, and studies have shown that people who quit are less likely to get it than current smokers.

It's not clear why smokers already diagnosed with lung cancer fare worse than non-smokers, Ferketich said.

"In general, never smokers are healthier individuals, so they tend to, in a lot of trials, have better outcomes with disease than people who continue to smoke," she said. "Just the continued exposure to tobacco might make the disease progress more quickly in smokers compared to never-smokers who don't have that exposure."

Ferketich said it's also possible that smoking could influence the biology of the cancer, and perhaps smokers get tumors that never-smokers are less likely to develop. She added that it's never too late to quit.

SOURCE: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/11/us-smoking-youth-idUSBRE89A1EF20121011

Cancer, online September 28, 2012.

Categories
All News  Now Viewing Category: All
Kinesiology, Recreation & Sport
CEBS
WKU Regional Campuses
DELO News
Housing & Residence Life
Math News
Glasgow News
WKU Educational Leadership Doctoral Program News
School of Journalism & Broadcasting
Media Relations
Academic Affairs
Augenstein Alumni Center
Instruments of American Excellence
Transportation
Emergency Preparedness
Police
Department of Music
Department of Theatre & Dance
Library News
Office of Sustainability
Office of International Programs
Office of Research
Ogden News
PCAL
WKU Parent and Family Weekend
Parent's Association
Student Activities and Organizations
Scholarships Student Financial Assistance
Student Government Association News
Van Meter Auditorium
Teaching News
Study Abroad
Student Research Council
Student Employment
WKU Joint Admissions
International Student Office
Human Resources News
Cultural Enhancement Series
CHHS News
The Confucius Institute
Campus Activities Board
GFCB
WellU
The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky
Development and Alumni Relations
Downing Student Union
Health Services
Hardin Planetarium
News from The Center for Gifted Studies
Student Financial Assistance
Downing Museum
Etown & Fort Knox
Facilities
Employee Wellness
Latest Headlines
University Blvd Lot and South Lawn Lot Reserved Tomorrow

Saturday, April 29th

Attorney General presents $500 award to SGA for 'Voice of Justice' video contest

During a visit to WKU on Wednesday (April 26), Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear awarded the WKU Student Government Association (SGA) $500 for winning the “viral award” in the “Voice of Justice” video contest.

WKU Bike4Alz group to ride across country again this summer

WKU students will bike across the country this summer to raise money for Alzheimer’s research.

Featured Articles
WKU Bike4Alz group to ride across country again this summer

WKU students will bike across the country this summer to raise money for Alzheimer’s research.

The Gatton Academy Advances to 2017 National Science Bowl

A team from The Gatton Academy won the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl on February 17 and advanced to the 2017 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C.

WKU melting old keys for classroom projects

After years of traditional recycling of keys, Access Control at WKU has found an innovative way to reuse the keys. Earlier this semester, the Architectural and Manufacturing Sciences Department melted 300 pounds of keys for students to use in class.

Note: documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) require Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 or higher to view,
download Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Note: documents in Excel format (XLS) require Microsoft Viewer,
download excel.

Note: documents in Word format (DOC) require Microsoft Viewer,
download word.

Note: documents in Powerpoint format (PPT) require Microsoft Viewer,
download powerpoint.

Note: documents in Quicktime Movie format [MOV] require Apple Quicktime,
download quicktime.

 
 Last Modified 4/18/17