Skip to main content
Western Kentucky University

Environment, Health and Safety

winter safety


Winter Walking
  •  Wear boots or overshoes with soles. Avoid walking in shoes that have smooth surfaces, which increase the risk of slipping.
  • Walk consciously. Be alert to the possibility that you could quickly slip on an unseen patch of ice. Avoid the temptation to run to catch a bus or beat traffic when crossing a street.
  • Stop, Look and Listen before crossing a street. Vehicles will have a harder time stopping during slippery conditions, and your chances of slipping and falling are greater as well.
  • Walk cautiously. Your arms help keep you balanced, so keep hands out of pockets and avoid carrying heavy loads that may cause you to become off balance.
  • Walk "small." Avoid an erect, marching posture. Look to see ahead of where you step. When you step on icy areas, take short, shuffling steps, curl your toes under and walk as flatfooted as possible.
  • When entering a building, stamp your feet on the mat to remove excess snow.  Notify your Building Coordinator or the Department of Facilities Management of slippery areas in hallways or on stairs.
Winter Driving

Kentucky State Police Winter Driving Tips

Road conditions throughout the state can be found on the Kentucky Department of Transportation's Web site at www.511.ky.gov , or by calling 511 in Kentucky or 1-866-737-3767 for out-of-state callers.

Winter storms and cold temperatures can be hazardous, but if you plan ahead, you can stay safe and healthy. Prepare your home and cars. Keep emergency kits stocked. Be ready for power outages. Wear appropriate clothing. Check on children, the elderly and pets.

"Be Prepared: Staying Safe and Healthy in Winter Weather" on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

"Winter Weather: Take Steps" on the CDC website

"Winter Storms and Extreme Cold" on the Federal Emergency Management Agency website

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if inhaled.
When power outages occur during emergencies such as ice storms, the use of alternative sources of fuel or electricity for heating or cooking can cause CO to build up in a home, garage, or camper and to poison the people and animals inside. Every year, nearly 500 people die in the U. S. from accidental CO poisoning.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning on the CDC website, including information on portable generators

View "The Quiet Killer" video on the CDC website

 

General University Weather Policies on the WKU Policies website

WKU Police Emergency and Weather Information

Cherry HallWalking to class on a snowy dayClearing the snowBig Red and SnowmanA snowy Centennial MallWatch for ice

Note: documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) require Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 or higher to view,
download Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Note: documents in Excel format (XLS) require Microsoft Viewer,
download excel.

Note: documents in Word format (DOC) require Microsoft Viewer,
download word.

Note: documents in Powerpoint format (PPT) require Microsoft Viewer,
download powerpoint.

Note: documents in Quicktime Movie format [MOV] require Apple Quicktime,
download quicktime.

 
 Last Modified 9/25/14