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Degree Tracks

Health Sciences Concentrations 

Students pursuing the Health Sciences major are required to select one of the following concentrations: Preparatory Health Sciences, or Health and Social Welfare. 

Preparatory Health Sciences Concentration 

Students who select this concentration will be required to complete 24 to 27 course hours. This concentration is designed to prepare students for a post-graduate or professional degree in a Health related field. Students who chose this concentration are looking to earn a bachelors degree in Health Sciences to continue their education at the graduate level to move one step closer to their desired career.

The Preparatory Health Sciences concentration is set up to help students obtain the majority of the required courses they will need in order to meet admission requirement for their specific graduate school program of choice. It is up to the student to research graduate schools and know what is needed for admission. The  Health Sciences Advisor will provide guidance and assistance for students  to help them reach their career goals.

Preparatory Health Sciences Concentration Classes

BIOL 120. BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: CELLS METABOLISM AND GENETICS

Corequisite: BIOL 121. Introductory course in biology that emphasizes cellular organization and processes, metabolism, DNA structure and replication, and Mendelian and population genetics.

BIOL 121. BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: CELLS, METABOLISM, AND GENETICS LAB

Corequisite: BIOL 120. Introductory laboratory in biology that emphasizes the experimental aspects of cellular organization and processes, metabolism, DNA structure and replication, and Mendelian and population genetics.


BIOL 122. BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: EVOLUTION, DIVERSITY, AND ECOLOGY

Corequisite: BIOL 123. Introductory course in biology that emphasizes evolutionary patterns and processes, diversity of life (bacteria, archaea, protists, plants, fungi, and animals), ecological principles, and conservation and management.

BIOL 123. BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: EVOLUTION, DIVERSITY, AND ECOLOGY LAB

Corequisite: BIOL 122. Introductory laboratory in biology for science majors that emphasizes the experimental aspects of evolutionary patterns and processes, diversity of life (bacteria, archaea, protists, plants, fungi, and animals), ecological principles, and conservation and management.


BIOL 131. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

A basic anatomy and physiology course designed for students in physical education and health science careers. Emphasis is placed upon the concept of homeostasis and relationship of structure and function.


BIOL 207. GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY                     

An introduction to microorganisms and their importance to humans (for non-biology majors). Approximately one third of the course is devoted to each of the three major areas of microbiology: organismal, environmental, and medical. (May be taken with or without the correlated laboratory course, BIOL 208, dependent upon the student’s curriculum requirements).

BIOL 208. GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 207. A laboratory course correlated with BIOL 207.


BIOL 224. ANIMAL BIOLOGY AND DIVERSITY

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 / 121 and BIOL 122 / 123 with grades of “C” or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 225. Survey of animal phyla and major classes with emphasis upon morphological adaptations and biological systems that have evolved to maintain organismal and population homeostasis.

BIOL 225. ANIMAL BIOLOGY AND DIVERSITY LAB

Corequisite: BIOL 224. A laboratory course correlated with BIOL 224.


BIOL 231. ADVANCED HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Prerequisites: BIOL 131 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent. Human anatomy and physiology for health science career students emphasizing an integrated organ systems approach to body function.


BIOL 344. BIOLOGY OF AGING

Prerequisite: Three hours of biology or consent of instructor. An introductory study of the mechanisms of aging processes with special emphasis on humans. Unfavorable progressive changes in molecules, cells, organs and organ systems will be discussed. Designed for non-biology majors.


CHEM 107. FUNDAMENTALS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Prerequisites: CHEM 105 and 106. Corequisite: CHEM 108. A continuation of CHEM 105 with a major portion of the course devoted to organic chemistry which ends the one-year course for non-science majors. It does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry.

CHEM 108. FUNDAMENTALS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Prerequisites: CHEM 105 and 106. Corequisite: CHEM 107. The laboratory to accompany CHEM 107. A major portion of the course deals with experiments in organic and biochemistry. Pre-lab lecture and laboratory meet two and one-half hours per week. 


CHEM 116. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE CHEMISTRY.

Prerequisite: MATH 116 or higher. A one-semester course for students desiring a general survey of chemistry with a mathematical emphasis. An introductory course for College Chemistry students whose ACT score in science and / or mathematics, or whose Chemistry Placement Exam scores would indicate marginal success in CHEM 120. Does not count toward a major / minor in chemistry nor does it satisfy the requirements for certain consumer and family science or agriculture majors. CHEM 106 laboratory is optional. A student cannot use both CHEM 101 and 116 for general education credit.


CHEM 120. COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on Chemistry Placement Exam or CHEM 116 with a grade of “C” or higher. Corequisite: CHEM 121. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 117 or higher. The beginning course in chemistry for science majors and minors. It also can be used for general education requirement. Covering the first half of the standard first year chemistry course, it is recommended that high school chemistry and a strong high school mathematics background precede this course.

CHEM 121. COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Corequisite: CHEM 120. Laboratory to accompany CHEM 120. One third of each meeting is spent reviewing material from the lecture and the remaining time is used to carry out laboratory investigations. Pre-lab lecture and laboratory meet once each week for three hours per week.


CHEM 222. COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II

Prerequisites: CHEM 120-121 with a grade of “C” or better and MATH 118. Corequisite: CHEM 223. A continuation of the first year course in chemistry for science majors and minors. It is also satisfactory for general education requirements for non-science majors and minors.

CHEM 223. COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY

Prerequisites: CHEM 120-121 with a grade of “C” or better and MATH 118. Corequisite: CHEM 222. Laboratory to accompany CHEM 222. A major portion of the course is devoted to semimicro qualitative inorganic analysis. Pre-lab lecture and laboratory meet for four hours per week.


CHEM 304. BIOCHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES

Prerequisite: CHEM 109 or consent of the instructor. A brief treatment of organic chemistry is used as an introduction to carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids emphasizing their functional roles in the biological system. Specific topics will include bioenergetics, enzymes, acid-base balance, hematology and immunology. The course is offered specifically for students in the four-year nursing program, but is also recommended for students in physical education, recreation, health and safety and other disciplines dealing with human health. This course does not count toward a major or minor in biology or chemistry.


CHEM 340. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

Prerequisites: CHEM 222-223 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisite: CHEM 341. The first half of the standard one year course for chemistry majors. Discussion includes various organic mechanisms and preparations. The entire sequence of CHEM 340-341, 342-343 should be completed. If only one semester of organic chemistry is desired, CHEM 314 should be taken.

CHEM 341. LAB ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

Prerequisites: CHEM 222-223 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisite:CHEM 340. Laboratory work includes studies of typical organic reactions and preparations.


CHEM 342. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

Prerequisites: CHEM 340-341 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisite: CHEM 343. A continuation of CHEM 340. CHEM 343.

CHEM 343. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY

Prerequisites: CHEM 340-341 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisite: CHEM 342. Includes studies of typical organic reactions and an introduction to qualitative organic analysis


HIM 291. ADVANCED MEDICAL TERMINOLGY

Prerequisite: AH 290 or consent of instructor. Terminology of diseases, operations and treatment modalities.


HIM 292. PHARMACOLOGY AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS

Study of pharmacology, laboratory tests and diagnostics as they relate to the management of health information.


HMD 360. ADVANCED NUTRITION

Prerequisites: HMD 211, BIOL 131, CHEM 107 or CHEM 109. An in-depth examination of the biochemical and physiological functions of nutrients and their relationships to health and disease. The digestion, absorption, transport, and excretion of nutrients are discussed. Includes the regulation and integration of metabolic pathways.


 

HMD 361: LIFE STAGE NUTRITION

Prerequisite(s): HMD 261. Study of nutrition needs of individuals in the various stages of the life cycle. Review of public and private enterprises involved in the delivery of nutrition services. Course requires off-campus experiences for which students are responsible for transportation and related activities and expenses.


HMD 368. DIETARY AND HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS

Prerequisite: HMD 211 or permission of instructor. Current topics related to dietary supplements. Regulatory guidelines and issues related to production, marketing, safety, and efficacy are addressed.


MATH 117 / MA 117C. TRIGONOMETRY

Prerequisites: Four years of high school mathematics including Algebra I and II and geometry, and satisfactory score on Math Placement Exam; or MATH 116 with a grade of “C” or better. Unit circle; trigonometric functions and graphs; trigonometric identities and equations; right triangle trigonometry; laws of sines and cosines; DeMoivre’s Theorem; vectors and applications of trigonometry. (Graphing calculator required.)


PH 365. HUMAN SEXUALITY

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations & Explorations courses, or junior status. Examines sociological, physiological, and psychological aspects of human sexuality in relation to family life, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, and aging. Includes information on sexual assault, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and HIV/AIDS.


PH 464. WOMEN'S HEALTH

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and permission of instructor. An analysis of the major health problems of contemporary women, with a special emphasis on health promotion, disease prevention, and consumer health concerns.


PH 468. SEXUALITY EDUCATION

Prerequisite: PH 365 or permission of instructor. A critical review of programs designed to promote sexuality education in community and school settings. Forces that impact on the adoption of various curricula and the development of new curricula are examined. Students are taught to utilize scientific and cultural considerations in preparing and adopting curricula for different populations.


PSYS 160. INTRO TO BIOPYSCHOLOGY 

An introductory class emphasizing the contributions of molecular, cellular, physiological, and evolutionary biology to the scientific understanding of psychological processes. Topics include the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, hormones and behavior, and the interaction of genes and environment.


PHYS 201. COLLEGE PHYSICS I

Prerequisites: High School algebra, geometry and right triangle trigonometry. An introductory course for students majoring in the applied sciences, emphasizing the application of basic physics principles through problem solving. Topics covered include mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, properties of matter and waves. Includes both lecture and laboratory components. (No calculus is used).


PHYS 202. COLLEGE PHYSICS II

Prerequisite: PHYS 201. Corequisite: PHYS 208 (Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.) A continuation of PHYS 201. The following topics are covered: electrostatics, electric field strength, electric potential difference, resistance, capacitance, DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, electromechanical devices, simple AC circuits, reflection, refraction, geometrical optics, physical optics, interference and diffraction. Includes both lecture and laboratory components. (No calculus is used).


PHYS 231. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS I

Prerequisites: High school algebra and geometry. Corequisite: PHYS 232 (Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.) The first half of a basic course for students of the life sciences, covering the topics of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, properties of matter, waves and sound. Emphasis is on an understanding of the physical principles operative in biological systems and on the application of physical methods in biology and medicine.

PHYS 232. LABORATORY FOR PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS I

Corequisite: PHYS 231. Required for students enrolled in 231. Students perform physics experiments on mechanics, fluids, sound, heat and thermodynamics.


PHYS 255. UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I

Prerequisite: MATH 136 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisites: MATH 137 and PHYS 256. This is the first half of a yearlong course in calculus-based physics suggested for students in the physical sciences and mathematics. Definitions, concepts, and problem solving will be emphasized. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy, conservation laws, rotation, harmonic motion, mechanical waves and thermodynamics.

PHYS 256. UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I LAB

Corequisite: PHYS 255. Required for students enrolled in PHYS 255. Students perform physics experiments in mechanics and thermodynamics which stress the fundamental definitions and laws developed in the lecture course. Students gain experience in computerized data acquisition and data analysis using modern techniques and equipment.


PHYS 332. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS II

Prerequisite: PHYS 231. Corequisite: PHYS 233 (Course and laboratory must be taken together or dropped together.) The second half of a basic course for students of the life sciences, covering the topics of electricity, magnetism, light optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Emphasis is on an understanding of the physical principles operative in biological systems and on the application of physical methods in biology and medicine.

PHYS 233. LABORATORY FOR PHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICS II

Corequisite: PHYS 332. Required for students enrolled in 332. Students perform physics experiments in electricity, magnetism and optics.

Health & Social Welfare Concentration 

Students who select this concentration will be required to complete 24 to 27 course hours. This concentration is designed to provide students with a general interest in Health Sciences to pursue a Bachelor’s degree by allowing students to take courses supporting a variety of Health and Social Services employment opportunities.

The main focus of the Health & Social Welfare concentration is home and community based services. As America’s aging population continues to grow, more elderly individuals, as well as those with mental and physical disabilities, are choosing to receive medical care and support services in their own homes instead of in nursing homes, hospitals, and other institutions.

The approach to home and community based services is designed to establish and manage networks of service providers capable of meeting these individuals’ daily needs.

Health & Social Welfare Concentration Classes 

BIOL 344. BIOLOGY OF AGING

Prerequisite: Three hours of biology or consent of instructor. An introductory study of the mechanisms of aging processes with special emphasis on humans. Unfavorable progressive changes in molecules, cells, organs and organ systems will be discussed. Designed for non-biology majors.


CNS 110. HUMAN RELATIONS

Theory, concepts, and skills necessary to increase self-awareness and improve relationships in social and academic settings. Processes of managing the problems of everyday life including conflict, and social demands.


COMM 348. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

Introduces students to the fundamentals of interpersonal communication, including interpersonal skills, theory, and research.


COMM 440. HEALTH COMMUNICATION

Prerequisite: COMM 200 or instructor permission for majors only. Non-majors have no prerequisites. Prerequisite / Corequisite: COMM 300 or instructor permission for majors only. Nonmajors have no prerequisites. Examines and analyzes the critical role communication plays in health campaigns, health care delivery, health care contexts, and in health behavior change.


COMM 450. FAMILY COMMUNICATION

Prerequisites: COMM 200 and 348. Prerequisite / Corequisite: COMM 300 or instructor permission. Designed as a survey of research and theory in family communication.


EXS 455. EXERCISE AND AGING

Prerequisite: GERO 100 or EXS 223. Designed for students to gain a better understanding of the acute physiological responses and chronic adaptations associated with exercise in the aged population and the role of exercise in the aging process. Specific attention will be given to the mitigating role of exercise in certain diseases and disorders.


FACS 310. MANAGEMENT OF FAMILY RESOURCES

Study of consumer and marketplace interactions in the purchase of goods and services. Decision-making processes are applied to individual and family resources for achieving maximum personal satisfaction.


FACS 311. FAMILY RELATIONS

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Study of issues affecting individual and family well-being. Interpersonal relationships and communication skills necessary to achieve quality of life are addressed.


FACS 395. CHILD AND FAMILY STRESS

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Acquaint students with major concepts from the research and conceptual literature on family stress and resilience. Examines stress as experienced and perceived by children and their families. Factors that influence children’s coping with stress are emphasized.


FACS 491. SEMINAR IN FAMILY ECONOMICS

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Current literature in family and consumption economics are studied and discussed. Curriculum changes in process. See FCS advisor


FACS 497. FAMILY HOME VISITING

Prerequisite: FACS 395 or FACS 494 or permission of instructor. Focuses on the design, implementation, and effects of human service programs aimed at promoting service provision in a variety of settings. Review of best practice, policy and research with families and young children in natural environments. Field experience hours required. Student is responsible for transportation.


FIN 161 / FINC 161C. PERSONAL FINANCE

Designed to serve the personal finance needs of students regardless of their major fields. Practical applications in personal and family financial planning, including credit, buying, borrowing, banking, insurance, investments, taxation, estate planning and home ownership.


GERO 100. INTRODUCTION TO THE AGING EXPERIENCE

An introduction to a variety of topics involved in the study of aging. Considers such issues as worldwide changing demographics, increased diversity among the aged, intergenerational relationships, and biopsychosocial concerns of aging.


GERO 461. PERSON-CENTERED DEMENTIA MANAGEMENT

A survey of dementia using a person-centered approach. Exploration of the diverse perspectives of persons diagnosed, family members, and both informal and formal caregivers.


HCA 345. LONG-TERM CARE ADMIN

Prerequisites: HCA 340. Introduce the special topics and operating environment facing longterm care managers today. Emphasis is on regulations, reimbursement, care delivery, and alternative delivery systems that deal with the elderly.


HCA 347. INTERNATIONAL HEALTH CARE 

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations & Explorations courses, or junior status. Cross country comparisons, including concepts of illness and healing within different cultural contexts; differing approaches to critical issues including access, quality of care, and cost containment; and methods of organization, financing and structuring of providers in various countries.


HCA 446. HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS

Prerequisites: HCA 340 Consideration of the vital role played by the exchange of organizational information in support of clinical care and management decision making in today's health care environment.

HCA 447. INFORMATION SYSTEMS LAB

Co-requisite: HCA 446 or equivalent. This course includes hands-on instruction in computer hardware, operating systems, and database architecture. Basic familiarity with personal


HCA 353. QUALITY IN LONG-TERM CARE

Application of quality management techniques with special emphasis on the types of populations, facilities, and expectations involved in long-term care service delivery programs.


HIM 100. HEALTH DATA CONTENT AND STRUCTURE

Emphasis on the health information profession, interdisciplinary relationships, health care data management, documentation standards, and methods of access and retention of image-based information and maintenance of health information in acute and no acute care facilities. Procedures for maintaining vital statistics and specialized registries will be included.


HIM 252. HEALTHCARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS

Overview of management of health care payment systems including insurances, billing and collection processes, case mix analysis, corporate compliance, HIPAA, and other current reimbursement issues


HIM 291. ADVANCED MEDICAL TERMINOLGY

Prerequisite: AH 290 or consent of instructor. Terminology of diseases, operations and treatment modalities.


HIM 292. PHARMACOLOGY AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS

Study of pharmacology, laboratory tests and diagnostics as they relate to the management of health information.


HMD 360. ADVANCED NUTRITION

Prerequisites: HMD 211, BIOL 131, CHEM 107 or CHEM 109. An in-depth examination of the biochemical and physiological functions of nutrients and their relationships to health and disease. The digestion, absorption, transport, and excretion of nutrients are discussed. Includes the regulation and integration of metabolic pathways.


HMD 367. NUTRITION IN AGING

Prerequisite: HMD 211 or permission of the instructor. Explores the nutritional needs of the aging adult, focusing on the various disease states and their nutritional ramifications. The nutritional implications for demographic groups in the aging population, and issues related to eating, pharmacology and physical activity in the elderly will also be reviewed. Field experiences will be required; students are responsible for their own transportation


HMD 368. DIETARY AND HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS

Prerequisite: HMD 211 or permission of instructor. Current topics related to dietary supplements. Regulatory guidelines and issues related to production, marketing, safety, and efficacy are addressed.


IDST 369. CAREER RELATED FIELD EXPERIENCE

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing with a declared major. Instructor permission is required. Work arrangements approved through the Center for Career and Professional Development with instructor consultation. Supervised work experience related to a student’s field of study or career goals within a cooperating business, industry, or agency. Students should work directly with the Center for Career and Professional Development and course instructor to identify goals, secure appropriate work experience, and review course requirements. Students are responsible for all internship-related transportation and travel. Students may repeat twice for a maximum of 3 total hours.


IDST 390. APPLICATIONS OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Application of interdisciplinary studies model to an overarching cultural concern or theme. Students will apply knowledge from different areas of study toward a specified research topic.


IDST 395. INVESTIGATIVE METHODS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A comprehensive exploration of different approaches to interdisciplinary studies as an academic research discipline or method.


MGT 200 / MGMT 200C. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. An introduction to the American public law system; use of law to achieve economic and social goals; legal responsibilities of the business manager.


MGT 301. BUSINESS LAW

Prerequisite: Junior standing. A basic course in commercial law covering contracts, property, creditor rights, torts and other bases for liability and the Uniform Commercial Code.


MGT 305. ETHICS AND CRITICAL THINKING

Prerequisites: MGT 200 and junior standing. This course is designed to develop skills needed for analyzing a problem or situation to arrive at a hypothesis or conclusion about it after synthesizing or integrating all available information. In critical thinking, all assumptions are open to question, divergent views are sought, and the investigation is not biased in favor of a particular solution.


MGT 333. MANAGEMENT OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Overview of nonprofit organizations, including budgeting, finance, marketing, communication, boards of directors, volunteers and strategic planning.


PH 100. PERSONAL HEALTH

Examines behaviors and environmental conditions that enhance or hinder an individual's health status. In addition to exploring social and environmental factors, students are encouraged to think critically about behavioral choices that impact ones' health. Students assess their individual behavior in the light of current scientific knowledge concerning mental health; drugs alcohol and tobacco; health care; selection of health products; prevention of disease; nutrition; exercise, and stress management.


PH 165. DRUG ABUSE

This course offers an opportunity for the student to explore the drug culture, and both healthful and harmful use of drugs. The scope will include marijuana, hallucinogens, narcotics, stimulants, depressants and volatile chemicals. Pharmacological, psychological and sociological aspects of drug abuse will be studied through individual research, group discussion, lectures and field trips when practical.


PH 261. FOUND/ HEALTH EDUCATION 

Prerequisite: PH 100. An introduction to the discipline of health education, including history, theoretical basis, comparison and contrast of work settings, ethics, professional organizations, and perspectives on the future.


PH 365. HUMAN SEXUALITY

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations & Explorations courses, or junior status. Examines sociological, physiological, and psychological aspects of human sexuality in relation to family life, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, and aging. Includes information on sexual assault, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and HIV/AIDS.


 

PH 410. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON POPULATION HEALTH

Prerequisites: Complete 21 hours of Foundations & Explorations coursework or have junior status. Population health focuses on the health and well‐being of entire populations. Populations may be geographically defined, such as neighborhoods, states, or countries, or may be based on groups of individuals who share common characteristics such as age, gender, race‐ethnicity, disease status, employee group membership, or socioeconomic status. With roots in epidemiology, public health, and demography, a key component of population health is the focus on the social determinants of health and “upstream” collaborative interventions to improve population health and variance, identify and reduce health disparities, and reduce healthcare costs.


PH 443. HEALTH AND AGING 

Prerequisites: PH 261 and junior standing. Examines the multiple factors affecting health of older adults. The course will discuss normal changes in aging and how to promote health of older adults. Students are required to have hands-on field experience. Students are responsible for their own off campus transportation


PH 444. DEATH EDUCATION 

Prerequisites: 3 hours of social or behavioral science, junior standing. A study of the universal experience of dying and death, within societal, cultural, philosophical and spiritual contexts, designed to help people make sense of their mortality and the development of coping skills to assist with dealing with the death of loved ones


PH 464. WOMEN'S HEALTH

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and permission of instructor. An analysis of the major health problems of contemporary women, with a special emphasis on health promotion, disease prevention, and consumer health concerns.


PH 467. DRUG ABUSE EDUCATION 

Prerequisite: PH 100 or equivalent. A drug abuse education and prevention course designed to provide current and documented information about abused substances. Includes study of the development, implementation and evaluation of drug prevention programs in the home, school, community and workplace.


PH 468. SEXUALITY EDUCATION

Prerequisite: PH 365 or permission of instructor. A critical review of programs designed to promote sexuality education in community and school settings. Forces that impact on the adoption of various curricula and the development of new curricula are examined. Students are taught to utilize scientific and cultural considerations in preparing and adopting curricula for different populations.


PSYS 333. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

Prerequisites: PSYS or PSY 210 and PSYS or PSY 211 with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of the instructor. Overview of theory and research in human cognition, with primary emphasis on attention, memory, judgment and decision-making, and problem solving. Cognition in special populations (e.g., elderly, brain-injured, mentally disordered) is also covered


PSYS 423. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADULT LIFE AND AGING

Prerequisites: PSYS or PSY 100; 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status. Psychological processes in adulthood and aging. Emphasis on contemporary theories, methodological issues, and interactions of psychological, biological, social, and environmental factors in adulthood and aging.


SOCL 342. AGING IN SOCIETY

Prerequisite: SOCL 100 or consent of instructor. An analysis of the elderly and their position in society. Attention is directed to aging as it relates to various social institutions and to the social aspects of aging in contemporary American society.


SOCL 440. MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY

Prerequisite: SOCL 100 or consent of instructor. A comprehensive introduction to sociological factors in disease etiology and illness behavior; the organization and operation of health delivery systems; and the social interaction between organization administrators, health professionals and semi-professionals, patients, and the public.


SPED 200. THE CULTURE OF DISABILITY

Social and cultural perspectives on disabilities. Covers major types of disabilities, disability as a socially-constructed concept, images and stereotypes of disabilities within various cultures, and cultural norms that create barriers to individuals’ participation in society.


SWRK 101. FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN SERVICES

Starting with the basic principles, concepts and a historical perspective, the course will examine problems addressed by diverse social service programs and explore their activities.


SWRK 205. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK

An introduction to the social work profession and its value, skill and knowledge bases. The history, development, and current status of the social work profession are explored. This introductory course emphasizes appreciation of and respect for human diversity as core concerns of professional social work practice.


SWRK 326. SERVICES FOR THE OLDER AMERICAN

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course focuses on individual and societal aspects of aging with emphasis on programs, resources and services to meet the social tasks of later life. Field trips to off-campus locations are required. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation.


SWRK 330. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I

Prerequisites: SWRK 101 and 205. Prerequisite for majors: Admission to the program. The social, natural, and behavioral sciences are used to examine human behavior across the life span, especially as influenced by ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and ability.


SWRK 357. CASE MANAGEMENT

 This course introduces students to the fundamental aspects of case management (service coordination), including common case management roles, processes, responsibilities, and employment challenges. Major content areas include: case management roles (including advocate, broker, resource coordinator), the roles and responsibilities of the multidisciplinary team (including nurses, social worker, physicians, and other disciplines), case management with special populations (forensic, geriatric, children, diverse populations), and the responsibilities of a case manager working in health care and mental health settings. Students will be introduced to the employment challenges of case management (types of programs that hire case managers, workforce retention issues, expectations of case manager, and job satisfaction). Students will develop familiarity with how case managers and clients interface with individual, group, and family systems. Students will develop knowledge of case management ethics and explore common ethical dilemmas and boundaries issues that confront case managers.


SWRK 395. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND ISSUES

 Prerequisite: SWRK 330. An understanding of the historical perspectives of social welfare policies as they affect current policy issues. Includes examination of the processes of policy formulation. Models of policy analysis assist students in identifying, and their impact on citizens representing a diversity of backgrounds


SWRK 437. MILITARY SOCIAL WORK

This course is designed to increase knowledge and competence in the area of social work services delivered to military personnel, Veterans and their families. Knowledge, values and skills required to work with this special population will be covered, along with evidence-based interventions that would be best suited for this area of social work practice.

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 Last Modified 7/26/16